21 June 2011

{Step by Step: How to Make Lefser}


Soon I'll post a lovely little post on the joys of making lefser with my farmor deep in the fjord country of Norway. But the process of making lefser is arduous and complicated; therefore I thought I'd share a step-by-step guide with you, before sharing my great-grandmother's recipe. Hopefully you'll grasp the process and realise that it's nothing to be afraid of. A challenge, yes, but a good one at that. Anyways, the first thing you do is make the lefsegraut (lefse-porridge). Then add as much flour as you need to form a homogeneous, firm dough. The first rule in the art of making lefser is to kneed, and you need to kneed a lot! Divide the dough in two, and work with one at a time.



Roll each dough into a sausage, and divide into eight or nine equal-sized pieces. Roll each piece into a ball-like shape and flatten on an oilcloth (voksduk), so that the dough doesn't stick to the table.



The second rule in the art of making lefser is flour generously. Using a rolling pin, flatten the dough (remember to keep adding lots of flour!) until the lefsa is thin. Using a long, thin baking pin, lift the lefsa from the oilcloth, turn it over and keep rolling until the lefsa is nearly see-through.


Lift the lefsa from the oilcloth using the baking pin and place it on a griddle (takka). The lefsa should turn a light shade of golden.


Allow the lefser to rest until you intend to serve them. 



Then, moisturise them with water (splashing water from a tap is okay) and place each lefsa on a piece of cloth. Place a piece of cloth between each lefsa (the cloth should cover the lefsa entirely). Keep placing the lefser on top of each other, separated by cloth, until you no longer have any lefser left. You can stable them on top of each other in two piles. Leave them like this for about half an hour.


Meanwhile, make the filling and spread a thin layer of the filling on the lefsa, making sure to butter the corners/edges as well. You don't want a spread a thick layer of the filling. Don't even go there.



Meanwhile, make the filling and spread a thin layer of the filling on the lefsa, making sure to butter the corners/edges as well. You don't want a spread a thick layer of the filling. Don't even go there.


Next, fold each side of the lefsa towards the centre. Then fold the two layers on top of one another and press together. Using a pair of scissors, cut the two ends of each lefsa. This will leave you with a pretty rectangle. Cut the lefsa into small rectangles and serve or freeze.

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