23 October 2011

Tartiflette | Eating France



You know when you're sad but you don't really know why? I am sometimes. I just wake up, not particularly happy – sad, you might say – but I have absolutely no inkling why. I don't know whether this is a common phenomenon, or whether I'm just strange, but we all have days which you can only describe as one of those. And when I have one of those, there is only one thing that can properly comfort me. Comfort food. It's pretty self-explanatory, really; eating comfort food for comfort. When I say comfort food, I do mean something easy to make, something simple. Something I don't have to spend many hours making, something that won't challenge me. I don't remember who it was, but one food blogger defined comfort food as a ''culinary equivalent of a hug'', which pretty much sums it up. This tartiflette here gave me a big hug, so to speak.

Tartiflette is native to Rhône-Alpes, a gigantic region bordering Italy and Switzerland and home to France's gastronomical capital, Lyon. From my research I've concluded that they're big on potatoes, cream, onions and cheese, or mixtures thereof, plus sausages, naturally, like many regions. This has resulted in many lovely dishes that have even become common here in Norway, like the gratin dauphinois (or fløytegratinerte potetar). I won't pretend I've tried a whole lot of Rhône-Alpes food, but I did go to a restaurant in Paris specialising in the Savoy cuisine, where I happily devoured some raclette (again, potatoes and cheese!). They also make some delicious fondue, but I've always found the gratin dauphinois to be their best dish.

That was until I tried this tartiflette. It was perfect for my young Norwegian palette. Lovely cheese melted on crispy potatoes, flavoured with pork and spiced with thyme; together forming a warm and absolutely delicious ensemble. My stomach went to heaven. I hope yours does as well.


Tartiflette
Recipe adapted from Gourmet Traveller
 
*Ingredients*
50 ml olive oil
1 onion, finely chopped
100 g. lightly smoked bacon cut into matchsticks
125 ml dry white wine
6 waxy potatoes, such as desiree, cut into small cubes (leaving skin on)
100 ml pouring cream
250 g. Reblochon or any other washed-rind cheese

Fresh thyme, for decoration (optional)

1.Preheat oven to 180°C. Heat oil in large deep-sided frying pan, add onion and bacon and cook over low heat until onion is soft (5-10 minutes), add wine and cook until evaporated (2-3 minutes). Add potato and cook until tender (10-15 minutes), then season to taste. Add cream, cook for 1 minute and remove from heat.

2.Lay half the potato mixture in an 8 cup-capacity casserole or two 4 cup-capacity baking dishes, scatter over half the cheese, then repeat with remaining potato mixture and cheese. Bake until dish is golden and bubbling and potato is tender (30-45 minutes). Serve immediately with plenty of crusty bread.

50 comment (s):

pepperandsherry said...

I love that the potatoes in this are kept chunky rather than sliced up like in gratins. It looks lovely. Like you say, perfect comfort food!

Marion said...

Thanks! It also takes less time to prepare with chunks :)

Katie said...

Oh this looks so tasty! The best bit is the crunchy tops, yum! Do you think you could make this with milk instead of cream?

megan @ whatmegansmaking said...

oh wow, this looks so good! Those crunchy potatoes look perfect. Saw your picture on foodgawker and just had to click over - beautiful! :)

sensiblelessons.com said...

What a lovely comforting meal! I'll have to save this one for cooler nights! Very nice pictures too.

juventia_jesica said...

Lovely cheese, crispy potatoes, thyme, pork.... enough said... (:

Natalie said...

These looks amazing!

Fran said...

This looks fabulous and I too was drawn in by the chunky potatoes. Anything that gets me more crunchy surface is a good thing. Beautiful! I hope you're feeling better today.

susan said...

i love your honesty and I am kind of loving everything about this dish.

Marion said...

Thanks everybody!

Katie: Yes, I believe you can use milk, but I would use whole milk :)

M said...

great pictures! and it DID taste really really good!! :) good done!! ^^

Sarah said...

I just wanted to tell you that I made this dish last night and it was soooo delicious! I accidentally bought pure cream (the kind you have to scoop with a spoon), so I put a bit less in than the recipe called for and added a bit of water. It was still really yummy. Thanks for this recipe!

Marion said...

I'm glad you liked it :-)

Shera "The Expatriate" said...

This is my all time favorite french dish merci!

Marion said...

De rien ;)

Beth said...

This looks delicious, but I do not know what waxy potatoes, pouring cream or washed-rind cheese are !

Marion said...

Thanks :) Waxy potatoes are like boiling potatoes; they should not smoulder or be floury. Pouring cream is heavy cream, which you use to make thick sauces etc. It's not completely light, like whipped cream. And washed-rind cheeses are cheeses that have been wiped or brushed (''washed'') with saltwater or alcohol during production. Raclette cheese is an example. However, I didn't find any, so I used Gruyère cheese :)

The Girl With Lots of Ideas said...

I found your recipe on Pinterest.com I am going to try it tonight. I'm in California, so I hope I can find one of these cheeses.
Thank you for sharing!

Marion said...

I'm sure California has everything a kitchen needs! At least I like to think it has :)

Carrie's Experimental Kitchen said...

What a beautiful and elegant dish. I saw this on Kitchen Artistry and had to stop by.

Sharon said...

will be doing this dish next week, it is calling me, I can hear it.
souschefsecrets.blogspot.com

SuzieQ said...

I made this last night - delicious is about all I need to say!

T!na said...

Saw this on Pinterest and just had to stop by. This dish looks so DELICIOUS and is perfect for my family, everything we love. I am definitely going to try this.

Katy said...

Totally trying this!! And thank you for explaining waxy potatoes, pouring cream, and washed-rind cheese! I was reading the recipe to my husband telling him how I really wanted to make the dish but had no idea what you were talking about. LOL. Thanks again!

Anonymous said...

I always wanted this recipe. had something like this in France and it is amazing.

mkkiki said...

dont understand some of the measurements need in english

Marion said...

Which measurements do you not understand?

mkkiki said...

not sure what 50 ml for olive oil is nor 125 ml or the 250 g for the cheese or 100g for bacon means? and the heat what is 180c im a southern girl here and very unexperienced cook. send mail to mkkiki2@aol.com

Anonymous said...

By Southern you must mean from the Southern region of the United States. As you can see the recipe is quite in English, only rather than using Imperial measurements it has the Metric measurements that the entire rest of the world uses. Use your computer, there are dozens of conversion websites available.

Anonymous said...

Hi, I'm french from Rhones Alpes :-)
I totally adore this recipe, I'm sorry to tell you this but... That's not the real one.
There's NO thyme and pork... But there are mushrooms (a specific type, that we found a lot in Alpes, the 'trompettes' : black mushrooms very good !

Marion said...

@Mkkiki: So sorry I forgot to send you those conversions! 50 ml. olive oil is about 3 1/2 TBSP, 125 ml. white wine is about 4.2 fl. oz, 250 g. cheese should be about 7 1/2 - 8 oz., 100 g. bacon is a little less than 4 oz.... I think. You should know I'm more expert in the Imperial system. I've never learnt it before nor do I use it!

180 C is 356 F.

French from Rhone Alpes: Oui, je sais :) I got it off an Australian magazine so I guessed it wouldn't be completely authentic :)I couldn't find a proper French version. If you have one, please do send one to me! :)

mkkiki said...

Ty for answering my ? as im a very new cook and wish to at least give this recipe a chance.

mkkiki said...

French from Rhone Alpes ty for your comment i received by mail you are quite the nice person and thats a blessing

Veronica said...

Made this tonight and it was delicious! I used fontina bc that's what I had on hand...loved this!

it's just me said...

Your dish looks delish (and I'm pinning it) but I love your polka dotted baking pan!!

mkkiki2@aol.com said...

so glad you liked my polka dottede pan and thanks for saying so and so glad you pinned recipe

François said...

Tartiflette comes from SAVOIE, not Savoy...

Anonymous said...

200 seems like a very low temperature.

blujaded said...

I was able to make the conversions for my California kitchen (350 degrees F), but am curious about how to use the cheese. It seems like a soft cheese with a rind and the directions don't specify if it is sliced, shredded or...? Is the rind removed, or does it add flavor, like a brie? Can't wait to try this!

Marion said...

Hello blujaded: I usually slice it without the rind, but I don't think it's a huge problem if you keep the rind on

Donna said...

This looks amazing...can almost smell and taste it from here in the states! My only question is, is 'pouring cream' what we call heavy cream? Thank you! It looks delicious and can't wait to try it...would be great on a cold Winter's night! :)

Marion said...

@Donna: Thanks! Pouring cream is the same as heavy cream :)

Anonymous said...

Lovely, delicious, decadent potatoes! Before I could make them, I had to go out and buy a red polka dot baking dish! Thank you! Could you make a suggestion for a substitution for reblochon cheese? I am visiting daughter in Germany right now and will be heading back to the US soon, and I know I won't find that cheese in my area.

Marion said...

Thanks! You can use any fondue cheese available, really. I have used Gruyere in the past, but it's not ideal as it's too hard and too waxy, although it still was good... Soft cheeses (preferably from Savoie/Switzerland) are better than hard ones. Good luck!

Sarah said...

This looks delicious!

Claudia LaRue said...

Tusen takk for oppskriften. Kunne du fortelle meg hva "pouring cream" er? Jeg bor i USA og vil gjerne lage denne retten.

Vanda said...

Thanks for the recipe from Prague, Czech Republic! <3 With love, Vanda

Marion said...

Pouring cream has a fat content of only 35% and the lowest cream fat to milk ratio.

Anonymous said...

I had a lot of trouble with potatoes sticking in the frying pan, so I roasted them first, it worked very well! Thank you for the recipe!

adedomi said...

Por supuesto que la carne de cerdo es para acompañar, o sea que la hacemos como queremos, claro que si el horno está caliente lo aprovechamos. Me encantó. Ade de Montevideo Uruguay

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