9 November 2011

Have a God Morgon with Buckwheat Pancakes

I like many flours. I like the magical lightness tipo 00 gives to pizza. I like the chewy texture of cooked durum flour, be it couscous or pasta. I like rye flour for its health benefits as much as its odd taste. I even like wheat flour in the occasional challah or baguette. But I love buckwheat flour. Absolutely adore the stuff. 
 

Too bad then, that it's so expensive here in Norway. A tiny package of 500 grams costs me 50 kroner (about €6.5). If it were any other flour, I really wouldn't bother. As much as I love trying out different things, there's a limit and I have no intention of crossing it. Buckwheat, though, is in a different dimension of its own. Compared to other flours, it has a unique taste; very earthy and strange with a hint of some kind of 'nuttiness'. 
 

Apparently buckwheat is the main flour used in Eastern Europe – a main ingredient in blinis, for instance, but the flour is wildly used in other countries too, such as Japan, China, Korea and, of course, France. Indeed, the largest producer is Russia, followed by China, the Ukraine, France and Poland. Personally, I first tasted in this summer when I was in Brittany, where buckwheat – known as blé noir or sarrasin – is pretty much the only flour in their traditional cuisine. The Bretons use it to make their delicious galettes de blé noir (savoury crêpes), but is also cooked and served in their kig-ha-farz (lit. meat and stuffing), among others. Naturally, this is all to be encouraged. 
 

But enough about the flour, let's talk pancakes. If you're used to ''American-style'' pancakes, then these are nothing like it. To clarify, they're not sweet at all. Just earthy. And slightly nutty. If you're more used to Russian-style blinis, then you'll find these taste (almost) the same. Don't let the lack of sweetness bother you, though. You can now add loads of maple syrup to your pancakes without feeling the slightest pangs of guilt. Neat, right? I mean, I know I said I always prefer savoury breakfasts, and I did try serving these with brown cheese, but it was just wrong. So off I went to the kitchen cupboard to find the bottle of maple syrup dad brought home from Canada, only to find the few drops left mouldy. Good thing I had fresh blueberries in the refrigerator. 
 

And... in case I haven't convinced you yet (and at the risk of sounding like a salesmen), buckwheat flour is gluten-free, so perfect if you have any breakfast guests who are sensitive to gluten. Personally I use this as an excuse to eat many more than I should. It's quite illogical, but everyone has an Achilles heal and this is mine. So let's just not tell anyone, okay?



Buckwheat Pancakes
Recipes by London Eats

*Ingredients*
225 g. buckwheat flour
1 tsp. baking powder
300 ml. milk
50 ml. water
1 egg
Pinch of salt

1.
Put all the ingredients in a bowl and whisk until the batter is smooth.

2.
Heat a frying pan and grease with a little oil or butter. Pour enough batter to make palm-sized pancakes (you will get three in a large pan) and cook until the top is covered in bubbles. Flip over and cook until golden.

18 comment (s):

FoodEpix said...

Well, I had to tell you, I am getting extremelly hungry everytime I see your posts and pictures. :)

Marion said...

:) Thank you! It's nice to hear =)

SharkDIVA said...

It's not a russian dish!
I have never eaten it!

Marion said...

Okay, I'm sorry, that's what I read :)

SharkDIVA said...

borscht-it's traditional dish)
Have you ever cook it?
:)

Marion said...

No, but I have heard of it. Is it good?

SharkDIVA said...

Yes! it's a very very very yummy. But it's true only if you can cook it very vell))
I live in Russia and there everybody can cook it)
And also our traditional dish is "pelmeni". Maybe you know what is it ;)

Marion said...

:) I actually don't know much about the Russian cuisine, though I would love to learn more. I'm going to Moscow in May, so I'll explore it a bit then :D

SharkDIVA said...

Do you like Russia and our culture?
Do you know Russian?

Marion said...

I am very interested in Russia, its history and culture, which is why I'm going to Moscow (and Siberia!) but unfortunately I no little Russian. Just some few words :)

SharkDIVA said...

And why do you like Russia so much???
I hope, that you don't think what all our people is drinkers:D or there are many bears go on the strit and play on balalaika :D
Excuse me for my mistakes! I don't know English very well)
Привет из России!

Marion said...

I don't know, really... Good question :) I think it's because I've heard so much about it from the media, and I'd like to see for myself whether it's true or not.

Of course I don't think that! :) I know there's lots of good things about Russia as well; I have Russian friends and I see positives and negatives, as you will in any country :D

Your English is great, don't worry :-) English is my third language, so it's foreign to me as well.

Do you have any good addresses to good restaurants/cafés in Moscow or Irkutsk?

SharkDIVA said...

mmm...I'm from Krashodar. And I have never been in Moscow) But I have been in St.Petersburg twice!
And I know what it's a very very very beautiful city! I's my dream to live there!
You must visit St.Petersburg, when you will be in Russia!

Marion said...

I would love to visit St. Petersburg, but I don't know if I have time... I'll let you know if I go!

SharkDIVA said...

Do you have page on facebook?

Marion said...

I only have a page for Ferdakost http://www.facebook.com/Ferdakost, where you can become a ''fan'' and send me messages etc. :)

SharkDIVA said...

Ok)
it's my page http://www.facebook.com/irisha.shurubova

Marion said...

Glad you became a fan :) But I cannot add you, as Ferdakost is a page, and pages can't have ''friends''. You can, however, write on the Ferdakost wall if you have any questions or comment :)

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