29 December 2011

The Time for Diets Has Not Yet Come


What a joy it was to wake up this morning to my brother telling me he had prepared breakfast! Breakfast! The smell of fresh coffee made my nostrils flare, and up the stairs I went. We all need such comforts and surprises every once in a while, especially when the weather is so depressing. Christmas may not be over yet, but the weather-gods are certainly not in the mood for festivities. Half the country is flooded and the rest seems to think it's still autumn. Urgh. Yuck.

It's okay though. It's a good excuse to, you know, hibernate, my way. With my animal instincts kicking in big time, all I seem to be interested in doing is eat (a lot!) of calorie-laden foods, cook, then eat some more. My father always says that the most important thing to keep in mind is not what you eat between Christmas and New Years, but New Years and Christmas, and it's become my new philosophy. And I take this seriously, too, for it is still Christmas. Ergo, I can eat as much as I please. Agreed?

So I'm not going to count calories at all. Instead, I'm going to tell you all about my French friend here: the gratin dauphinois. This is one of my favourite side dishes in the world, the sort of food that makes my heart skip a beat. It's true, I may be a little bias – it being French and all – but I'm also a huge supporter of anything from Rhône-Alpes (think tartiflette). A region which specialises in potatoes cooked with indecent amounts of cream and cheese. What's not to like?


Now I also happen to have a cultural and genetic obligation to love the humble spud. It's been a staple food ever since it's introduction to this beautiful land of mine some 250-odd years ago. Traditionally every Norwegian family grew them, particularly in my region. I mean, we even have an annual spud festival! Hurrah for the spud! I do love them so. But the people of Rhône-Alpes, they really know how to treat a potato, and I love them for that. I have long since debated with myself on whether I prefer tartiflette to gratin dauphinois or vice versa, but now I have reached a conclusion. Whilst I would love a tartiflette to nourish me after a long day picking Edelweiß, I do think the gratin dauphinois, with all its cream and cheese, would be a better choice after a long day hiking in the Alps. Or what do you say?

This recipe is incredibly easy to follow, and is apparently a local recipe from Rhône-Alpes, which is lovely. It supposedly serves six but I say five. Or three very hungry hikers.


Gratin dauphinois
Recipe by Laylita's Recipes

*Ingredients*
6 medium-sized Amandine-style potatoes
6 garlic cloves, minced
300 ml heavy cream
750 ml. whole milk
3 eggs
230 g. Emmental or Gruyère, grated
Salt and pepper, to taste


1.
Pre-heat oven to 205 C.

2.
Peel the potatoes. Cut each in approx. 5 x 0.5 cm pieces. Place the potato slices in a 20 x30 cm baking pan.

3.In a bowl, mix
the eggs, whipping cream, garlic cloves, salt and pepper together.Add the milk, mix and pour oer the potatoes. Place the dish in the pre-heated oven, and let bake for 30 minutes.

4.Once the 30 minutes have passed, take the gratin out of the oven and layer the cheese uniformly to cover the top surface, then put it back 15 more minutes to let it melt and slightly brown.Once out of the oven, let it rest about 15 minutes before serving. 


Fløytegratinerte potetar
Oppskrift frå Laylita's Recipes

*Ingrediensar*
6 mellomstore Amandinepotetar
6 kvitlauksfedd, kverna
300 ml fløyte
750 ml. heilmjølk
3 egg
230 g. Emmental eller Gruyère, raspa
Salt and pepar


1.Varm opp omnen til 205 C.

2.Skrell potetane i kaldt vatn. Skjer kvar potet i omlag 5 x 0.5 cm stykke. Legg potetstykka lagvis i ei 20 x 30 cm bakepanna eller eldfast form.



3.Bland egga, fløyten, kvitlauken, salt og pepar godt saman i ein bolle. Hell i mjølka, rør saman, og hell over potetane i bakepanna. Legg bakepanna i omnen, og steik i 30 minutt. 


4.Ta bakepanna ut or omnen etter 30 minutt, strø på osten og legg tilbake i omnen. Steik i 15 minutt. Osten bør vera smelta og gylden. La kolne i 15 minutt før servering.

10 comment (s):

Simply Tia said...

This is a must try! I love how rich it is.

Sending you Best Wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year

Marion said...

Mhm, me too! I love everything about it :-) Happy New Year!

Anonymous said...

jamais, jamais de fromage dans le gratin dauphinois, na

Marion said...

Vraiment? Parce que la recette est française...

Allison@radishesandrhubarb.com said...

Looks so delicious. I think I will be making this for my New Years Day brunch!

Marion said...

Thank you! I hope it'll taste good too!

Anonymous said...

Could you convert to US measurements please?

Marion said...

Sure!

6 medium sized potatoes
6 garlic cloves
1 1/3 cups of heavy whipping cream
3 cups of milk; whole milk preferred
3 eggs
8 oz of grated Swiss or Emmental cheese
Salt and pepper to taste


1.Pre-heat oven to 400 F.

2.Peel the potatoes. Cut each in approx. 2 inch pieces. Place the potato slices in a 8 x 11.5 inch baking pan.

3.In a bowl, mix the eggs, whipping cream, garlic cloves, salt and pepper together.Add the milk, mix and pour oer the potatoes. Place the dish in the pre-heated oven, and let bake for 30 minutes.

4.Once the 30 minutes have passed, take the gratin out of the oven and layer the cheese uniformly to cover the top surface, then put it back 15 more minutes to let it melt and slightly brown.Once out of the oven, let it rest about 15 minutes before serving

Nathaniel said...

I've seen many recipes for dauphinoise, and tried some, but this one looks different and it looks exceptional. I will try this. Thank you. I love the food of Rhône-Alpes too. I'm going to try your tartiflette as well.

Maria M Triana said...

I love the food of Rhône-Alpes too. and this one looks different and exceptional.

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